Jun. 14th, 2017

paranoidangel: PA (PA)

What I Just Finished Reading
The Chalet School and Rosalie, and Trials for the Chalet School by Elinor M Brent-Dyer. These are both books I've read before, but I don't own, so haven't re-read. Or in the case of Trials, have only read the paperback with big cuts. I was really tired and didn't have a brain, so I looked at my to read shelf and thought this was the situation Chalet School books were perfect for. And they were. My only trouble was with Trials because it was very heavily Mary-Lou and I can only take her in small doses.

What I'm Currently Reading
Millions Like Us: Women's Lives During the Second World War by Virginia Nicholson. Iv'e been reading this on and off for a while. But it is at least up to VE and VJ Day, so while it's not all rosy, at least no one's finding bits of people who have been blown up in the blitz. It was interesting reading about the 1945 election while the election was going on here.

One particular interesting bit is about Nina Mabey, who had joined the Labour Club, while at Oxford university:

'Our duty was to make sure, when the war ended, that a new, happier, more generous society would take the place of the bad, old, selfish one.' And this was the line she had argued, vehemently, one evening in 1944, with another undergraduate in her year-group who, she discovered, was steering an opposite course by joining the Conservatives. The young woman in question was chemistry student Margaret Roberts, later to become Margaret Thatcher. [...] How on earth could one want to be associated with such a stuffy institution as the Conservative Club, when the Labour affiliates were all so much more fun? All the really interesting people were members.

"Margaret smiled, her pretty china doll's smile. Of course, she admitted, the Labour Club was, just at the moment, more fashionable - a deadly word that immediately reduced my pretensions - but that, in a way, unintentionally suited her purposes. Unlike me, she was not 'playing' at politics. She meant to get into Parliament and there was more chance of being noticed in the Conservative Club just because some of the members were a bit stodgy."

Sisters at the Chalet School by Amy Fletcher. What's been interesting about this one, for me, is that it's set in 1944. There's a moment towards the beginning of the book when one character mentions how they're glad bread isn't rationed. And I'd recently been reading about the shortages in the shops in 1945 and how bread began to be rationed in 1946.

What I'm Reading Next
Given that I've still got 100 pages of Millions Like Us to go, I think it'll be a while before I have to answer that question.

Mirrored from my blog.

June 2017

M T W T F S S
    1234
5678 91011
1213 1415161718
192021 22232425
2627282930  

Tags